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Cherry Red TV Programme Directory

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LABEL STORIES

The Bella Union Story with Simon Raymonde
Musician Simon Raymonde co-founded Bella Union in 1997 after a successful career with the Cocteau Twins. Having been signed to the legendary 4AD, he and fellow Twin Robin Guthrie looked to offer other artists – like Dirty Three, Laura Veirs and Fleet Foxes, to name but a few – the freedom of expression the Cocteaus enjoyed in the band’s early days. Raymonde, who continues to control Bella Union today, explains the label’s history and philosophy that was celebrated in 2007 with two nights at the Royal Festival Hall and will surely continue to flourish.

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The Plastic Head Story with Steve Beatty
Record distribution is a complex art, and the jovial Steve Beatty is a master of it. He founded Plastic Head in his bedroom at his parents’ house and, 15 years later, it’s one of the UK’s top ten distributors – Cherry Red among its clients. Beatty, who formed his own record label in 1985 before changing tack and looking at the bigger picture, entertainingly explains his personal journey, his view of the future and offers down-to-earth advice to anyone interested in getting involved in the ever-changing business of music.

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The Midnight Music Story with Nick Ralph
Nick Ralph moved from band manager through fanzine editor and record-shop owner to record-label boss. The experience he gathered gave him an unrivalled grounding to found Midnight Music in 1982, and the label’s progress initially paralleled 4AD and Cherry Red in the Eighties. First signings Sad Lovers And Giants, at that time rivals of U2, put them on the map, while the later absorption of September Records and the Medium Cool label added McCarthy, the Wolfhounds and the Corn Dollies to the Midnight roster. The story ended in the Nineties but the music the label purveyed has gathered kudos over the years and is currently enjoying CD reissue.

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The Cooking Vinyl Story with Martin Goldschmidt
Founded by Martin Goldschmidt in 1986, the world-renowned Cooking Vinyl label has enjoyed success with a wide variety of artists – from one–man band Billy Bragg, who stickered his records with a ‘pay no more than’ price, to rave-influenced rockers the Prodigy who have consistently topped the charts throughout Europe. The contractual control and flexibility Cooking Vinyl offer their artists won them the Prodigy’s hand in the face of major-label competition. As Martin explains, it is the ability to respond to an ever-changing music business that has kept him and Cooking Vinyl at the cutting edge of music for two and a half decades and counting.

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The Glass Records Story with Dave Barker
Operating between 1981 and 1989, Glass Records never sold in their millions, but names like Spacemen 3, the Jacobites, Pastels, Jazz Butcher and In Embrace still resonate today. Label founder Dave Barker tells the story of the label, named after a band he was once in, and how, from working for PolyGram distribution, he found himself running one of the country’s hippest labels. Glass Records effectively ended with the collapse of Rough Trade distribution, but their story remains a fascinating one.

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The No Future Records Story with Chris Berry
Taking their name from the Sex Pistols anthem, No Future Records was formed in 1981 by Chris Berry and Richard Jones with the aid of a £1,000 bank loan. A music-press advert asking for demo tapes led to the signing of bands like Blitz, the Partisans, Peter and the Test Tube Babies and Red Alert who spearheaded the regional re-emergence of punk. The first Blitz EP went to Number 1 in the independent charts, and was the first of 29 singles and nine EPs issued by No Future between 1981 and 1984. Chris Berry tells the story of a label with a limited but worthwhile lifespan.

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The Cherry Red Story Part 1 with Iain McNay
Cherry Red began life as a promotions company in Great Malvern, Worcestershire, in 1971. Iain McNay and Richard Jones, two of the three individuals behind its success, then formed a record company to release their a single by local band the Tights; over three decades later, McNay is still at the helm of a thriving family of labels. Here he traces Cherry Red’s early history, including the signing of significant acts like Morgan-Fisher, the Runaways and the Dead Kennedys, the move into music publishing and the recruitment of A&R man Mike Alway that brought a stream of fresh young talent into the label, including the likes of Eyeless in Gaza, Felt, the Monochrome Set, the Marine Girls, Tracey Thorn, Ben Watt and the Passage.

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The Cherry Red Story Part 2 with Iain McNay
The simultaneous and unexpected departures of A&R chief Mike Alway and Phil Langham, who ran the punk-oriented Abstract label, in 1983 changed the face of Cherry Red. Iain McNay reassumed control before, in 1987, taking a four-year sabbatical for personal reasons. On his return, the acquisition of material from many of the significant independent labels of the late Seventies and early Eighties, such as Flicknife, Red Rhino, No Future, Rondelet, Midnight, Temple and In Tape laid the foundations of the label as a reissue-based operation, in which form Cherry Red not only survives but thrives today. Iain traces the evolutionary process of a company that now issues over 60 CDs, DVDs and books each and every month.

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The Survival Records Story with David Rome and Anne-Marie Heighway
True to their name, Survival Records has been operating as an independent record company since 1980, justifying their name. Lawyer-turned-musician David Rome and Anne-Marie Heighway started off playing and singing synthesizer-based dance music. They then signed electronic duo Tik and Tok before moving into rock and finding success with the Quireboys. There then followed an unexpected change in musical tack, provoked by an influential band. Since 1990 when they signed Scots band Capercaillie Survival have become leaders in the Celtic music scene: this is their highly individual story, told by the founders themselves.

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The Nude Records Story with Saul Galpern
Saul Galpern formed Nude Records in 1992, having moved to London from his native Glasgow to work in a record shop. He was then involved with the Fall, the Slits and the Mo-Dettes on an indie before a spell with major label Elektra, where he discovered Simply Red. Nude’s first success was with Suede, whose debut album broke sales records and kick-started the Brit-pop movement, after which the label launched Black Box Recorder and the solo career of Billy McKenzie. Galpern looks back with typical frankness on his successes and failures, explains why he put the label into abeyance and why he then relaunched Nude with a genre-defining compilation album.

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The Oval Music Story with Charlie Gillett
Charlie Gillett is a world-renowned journalist, author (the acclaimed Sound Of The City) and radio DJ, a man with an unparalleled knowledge of the global music scene. Few know, however, of his other life as boss of Oval Music, a label named after his local south London cricket ground that he formed with Gordon Nelki in 1972. It helped launch the career of Ian Dury, Lene Lovich and Paul Hardcastle among others, while Elvis Costello and Dire Straits are acts to owe him a debt for his early championing of their cause. Charlie tells his fascinating story as only he can.

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The Esoteric Recordings Story with Mark Powell
Mark Powell is among the best-known music consultants in Britain, specializing in Sixties and Seventies rock from Britain and continental Europe. He has collaborated with artists as diverse as Cream’s Jack Bruce, Hawkwind (whose Atomhenge reissue label he curates), Barclay James Harvest and Arthur Brown, and releases their music on his Esoteric Recordings label. Powell‘s journeys into the dusty vaults of the record companies in search of unreleased treasures – and his encounters with their creators – have provided him with many ear-catching stories no fan of the genre will want to miss.

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The RPM Records Story with Mark Stratford
RPM, founded by Mark Stratford and with sleeves artworked by legendary rock archivist Phil Smee, has a reputation for being one of the classiest niche reissue labels in Britain with lavish packaging, minute attention to detail and consistently discerning musical taste. The label came under the Cherry Red umbrella in 1999 and has since gone from strength to strength, focusing on pop music from the Sixties to the dawn of punk. They now also incorporate the Shout label, offering vintage soul presented with the retro style to which their fans have become accustomed. Mark explains all here.

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The Riot City Records Story
Simon Edwards is interviewed by Iain McNay about the birth and rise of Riot City Records, the Bristol based punk label.

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The Heartbeat Records Story with Simon Edwards
Simon Edwards formed Heartbeat, one of the first of the new breed of indie labels in 1978, having made the transition from fan to participant. A spell as a ‘failed musician’ later he was helping others turn their musical dreams into reality, his roster of influential artists ranging from the Glaxo Babies to Blue Aeroplanes. He explains his philosophy and how the seminal ‘Avon Calling’ compilation put Heartbeat’s native West Country on the musical map with a vengeance in 1980 and caught the ear of John Peel himself. Heartbeat spun off other niche labels like Riot City and was influential for a period: the story makes fascinating listening.

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The Razor Records Story With Robin Greatorex
Robin Greatorex’s career in music has covered almost every facet of the business. He started off in a recording studio the early Seventies, then began doing press for the Only Ones and Showaddywaddy and entered band management before starting Razor Records in the early Eighties. He established Razor as a streetwise indie, using the knowledge gleaned in previous years to remain close to the cutting edge. They survived a distributor going bankrupt, but it proved an uphill struggle and for every Adicts, who worked hard and sold product, there was a Max Splodge who didn’t. They launched Newtown Neurotics, a Phill Jupitus favourite, but after dabbling with the Mod revival they licensed the Spinal Tap soundtrack as a last hurrah.

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The Jungle Records Story With Alan Hauser
Best known for releasing the late, great Johnny Thunders’ iconic punk product, Jungle Records have been around since 1982. Alan Hauser formed his first indie label Parole in Britain in 1977, utilising a background in band management, live promotion and collector’s records. Here he explains how he founded the label with fellow music fanatics who had been working at Fresh Records, released albums by trendsetting goths Fields of the Nephilim and how Jungle continues to be excited about new music as well as cataloguing the past.

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The él records Story With Mike Alway
Mike Alway was Cherry Red Records’ first A&R man, and one with an enviable track record at spotting talent. In 1985 he returned after a two-year absence and él records was formed under the Cherry Red umbrella. él was a critical success, setting trends with artwork and image, especially in Japan, during its three-year lifespan. It lived up to the promise of ‘making records that were spontaneous and imaginative with people of character and often regardless of their musical ability.’ Alway, who today runs él as a classy reissue label, relives those glory years and ‘el-oquently’ explains his philosophies.

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The Abstract Sounds Story With Edward Christie
After trying his luck as a jobbing songwriter in the Seventies, Edward Christie took to the post-punk DIY ethos and formed Abstract with a combination of savings and redundancy money. Things looked unpromising at first but the 16-track ‘Punk And Disorderly’ compilation, released in the early Eighties, shot into the Top 40 and its overnight success gave him the clout to sign artists like the UK Subs, Three Johns and New Model Army. He has since diversified into soul, extreme metal and hip-hop, and his story is a unique and fascinating one demonstrating that persistence and flexibility can bring rewards.
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The Pillows & Prayers Story With Iain McNay & Mike Alway
The indie chart-topping 17-track compilation album featuring artists on the Cherry Red label sold over 120,000 copies after its Christmas 1982 release. ‘Pillows & Prayers’ helped put bands like Everything But The Girl, the Monochrome Set and Felt on the map, helped in no small measure by a pocket-friendly 99p price tag. When reissued in 2007 as a deluxe CD/DVD box set, the album deservedly won the Mojo magazine award for Catalogue Release of the Year. Iain McNay and Mike Alway, the men responsible for this unique release, tell the fascinating background story of a fondly remembered artefact that defined an era while providing a marketing masterclass to the music business.

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The Dandelion Records Story With Clive Selwood
John Peel and manager Clive Selwood formed Dandelion Records in 1969 as an attempt to put something back into the business they loved and give several worthwhile, if sometimes uncommercial artists a break. The groundbreaking indie, modelled on Elektra Records in the States, released 28 albums by 18 acts during its brief, three-year life and would prove inspirational to many. The dapperly-dressed and ever entertaining Clive revisits those heady days, with reminiscences ranging from Frank Sinatra to Gene Vincent, via Kevin Coyne and Clifford T Ward. Not forgetting his relationship with Peel, the hub around which Dandelion rotated.

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ARTIST STORIES

The Story of Red Box with Simon Toulson-Clarke
Red Box came to the attention of the world with their debut single "Chenko" on Cherry Red Records in 1983. The band enjoyed further single chart success and released two albums, 'The Circle & The Square' and 'Motive'. Here principal song writer and lead singer, Simon Toulson-Clarke, talks to Matt Bristow about his pop career so far.

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The Pete Banks Story
Formed in London in 1968, Yes are widely regarded as one of the archetypal Progressive Rock bands to emerge from the UK. Pete Banks was their original guitarist and included in Gibson Guitar's 'Lifestyle' magazine’s "10 Great Prog Rock Guitarists" in 2009. Here he talks to Esoteric label manager Mark Powell about his life in Rock.

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My Hawkwind Adventures by Harvey Bainbridge
Harvey Bainbridge is a British Bass & keyboard player who initially joined Hawkwind members Dave Brock and Robert Calvert in 1977 in a band called Sonic Assassins. He then went on to play Bass guitar with Hawkwind until 1984 appearing on classic albums such as Levitation & Live Seventy Nine. Here he talks to Atomhenge label boss Mark Powell about his cosmic adventures with the seminal Space Rockers.

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The John Otway Story
One of British music's most endearing characters, the inimitable John Otway has been performing and recording for the past three decades, building a dedicated cult following through relentless touring. In this typically frank and often mirth-inducing hour-long interview with Iain McNay for cherryred.tv, John talks about his career, life and music at length. He was also kind enough to play three acoustic songs in the studio: 'Cor Baby That's Really Free', 'Beware Of The Flowers' (both sides of his breakthrough 1977 hit) and 'Poetry And Jazz'. Not to be missed by lovers of English pop eccentricity!

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The Les Reed Story
One of the unsung heroes of British song, composer Les Reed OBE has been a performer conductor artist and producer. His first big break was playing piano with the John Barry Seven. Since then he’s worked with many great names over his half-century in the business, including Joe Brown, Ike and Tina Turner, Adam Faith and Lulu, written hits for Tom Jones (‘Delilah’, ‘It’s Not Unusual’) and Engelbert Humperdinck (‘The Last Waltz’) and has been an eyewitness to some historic musical moments. This hour-long interview is packed with insight, information and anecdote told by a man who’s been there, done that and worn the T-shirt. (Did we mention the OBE?)

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The Louis Philippe Story
Louis Philippe, real name Philippe Auclair, is a London-based French singer, songwriter, arranger and producer who first came to attention in the mid Eighties. He was a leading artist with the él record label and found great success in Japan; since then he’s combined music with being a sports journalist for French radio and the prestigious publication France Football, finding time to write a biography of Eric Cantona. His twin passions are explored in this in-depth talk with Iain McNay, a man who sees life in very much the same way. Keep an ear open for seagulls and trawlers…

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The Momus (Nick Currie) Story
Nick Currie, cousin of Del Amitri singer Justin, is known in hip music circles as Berlin-based one-man band Momus. He first came to attention with the Happy Family, a group formed with musicians from Scotland’s Postcard Records. He left university and concentrated on music and appeared on several influential labels including 4AD and Creation. His current association with Cherry Red has endured for many years. Currie’s career has been marked by innovation and controversy, and much of this controversial hour-long soliloquy on his career and the aspirations of others will raise eyebrows.

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The Bridget St John Story
Coming from a very musical background, singer-songwriter Bridget St John was discovered by late great DJ John Peel and signed to his Dandelion Records label. She’s gone on to enjoy a long and successful career since her first release in 1969 when she was compared to the sublime Sandy Denny of Fairport Convention. She worked extensively with John Martyn, another folk icon who is sadly missed. Now based in the United States and hugely popular in Japan, her career has seen many fascinating twists and turns, all of which are explored as she relives the high and low points in conversation with Meg Greenhorn.

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The Alvin Stardust Story
Best remembered as the leather-clad, black-gloved rocker who stared sullenly down Top Of The Pops cameras in the glam-rock early Seventies, Alvin Stardust had already enjoyed fame in the beat era a decade earlier as Shane Fenton. After his spell in the Seventies charts he was reborn yet again in the Eighties as a retro-pop balladeer, songs about Buddy Holly harking back to his youth. His half-century in the business has seen many changes and he has adapted to them far more effectively than most, so his story is a fascinating one. Alvin recounts it with a welcome humour – the ‘stick-on sideburns’ story is worth the price of admission alone!

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The Benjamin Zephaniah Story
Born and raised in Birmingham’s rough and ready Handsworth district, Benjamin Zephaniah is a British Jamaican Rastafarian writer, musician and poet. His stature in contemporary English literature was underlined by his inclusion in The Times list of Britain's top 50 post-war writers in 2008. Iain McNay invites Benjamin to reveal the many sides of his talent, going back to his first word-play as a child and moving on through a brush with the law, his move to London and riding the wave of post-punk culture through to meeting Nelson Mandela and more. Oh, and expect the occasional poem!

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The Duncan Reid Story
The Boys were a London-based punk band with a Stones-like swagger who moved in the same circles as the likes of Billy Idol, the Clash and the Sex Pistols but, despite their undoubted talents, never broke out commercially. Duncan Reid, who played bass and co-sang lead vocals, recounts the story of bad record deals and even worse luck at crucial career junctures. Although the Boys never achieved the commercial success they deserved, their music has refused to die and the reissued albums have sold strongly to later generations. Europe in particular has treasured the Beatles/Stones/Small Faces references in their music.

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The Sonja Kristina Story
After coming to prominence as a performer in the hippie musical Hair, former teenage folk-singer Sonja Kristina became frontwoman of British progressive rockers Curved Air. Their classical-influenced music, fronted by sexy Sonja and violinist Darryl Way, was a sensation and made them leaders in the post-Beatles rock boom. She tells the fascinating story of her late Sixties/early-Seventies stardom, which was followed by marriage to Police drummer Stewart Copeland, a spell in the wilderness and a return to her roots as a folk performer. Added to this are tales of Swinging London, a tryst with Donovan and some fascinating insights behind the façade of the entertainment scene, all recounted with passion and humour.

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The Monochrome Set Story With Bid
The Monochrome Set were formed in 1978 from the remnants of London college group the B-Sides which had included Andy Warren and Adam Ant. Lead singer Bid (real name Ganesh Seshadri) delivered the dry lyrics with accompaniment from guitarist Lester Square and others. Having passed through Rough Trade and DinDisc, they ended up on Cherry Red but broke up in 1985. They then re-formed from 1990-98 around the nucleus of Bid and bassist Andy Warren, and ten years later reunited for a one-off performance at Cherry Red's 30th Anniversary party at Dingwalls, London. These and many more adventures are recounted by the inimitable Bid to Iain McNay, whose record label provided the canvas for their idiosyncratic visions.

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The John Fiddler Story
Medicine Head, the duo of singer/guitarist John Fiddler and harmonica player Peter Hope-Evans, enjoyed a successful career in the late Sixties and early Seventies after being ‘discovered’ by DJ John Peel. John Fiddler now lives in America, and works mostly as a solo artist, but found time to recount the high and low points of his career that saw songs like ‘Rising Sun’, ‘One And One Is One’ and ‘Slip And Slide’. These built on the early success of ‘His Guiding Hand’, a favourite of John Lennon and Yoko Ono among others, which was recorded in a kitchen on a reel-to-reel tape recorder – punk before punk!

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The Morgan Fisher Story
Morgan-Fisher, previously keyboardist with Love Affair, Mott the Hoople and Queen among many other appointments, wrote himself into indie-music history with ‘Hybrid Kids’, a 'compilation' album on Cherry Red containing performances by unknown bands. Morgan did a series of interviews with the music papers and Radio 1, convincing everyone that the album was by real bands and not, as was the case, all his own work! A later album, ‘Miniatures’, comprised 51 one-minute tracks by Robert Fripp, the Pretenders, XTC, Penguin Cafe Orchestra, Robert Wyatt, Ivor Cutler and the Damned. He now lives in Japan and has a career in photography running parallel to his music. Iain McNay interviews this complex personality.

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The Carter USM Story With Jim Bob
The early-Nineties success of Carter USM, the two-man band featuring Jim Bob (real name James Morrison) and Les Carter was both unexpected and unstoppable. They had 14 Top 40 singles, a Number 1 LP (‘1992 – The Love Album’) and played over 800 gigs all over the world – a rollercoaster ride that just had to be turned into an equally breathtaking book. Goodnight Jim Bob – On The Road With Carter The Unstoppable Sex Machine is considerably catchier than its title, and Jim Bob draws from it as he relives those halcyon days and beyond in the company of Mark Bristow.

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The Jan Schelhaas Story
Liverpool-born despite his exotic moniker, the flashing-fingered Jan Schelhaas has supplied keyboards to several well respected British progressive rock bands from the early Seventies onwards. Starting with his recording debut with his own National Head Band, he backed Gary Moore before joining Caravan, with whom he recorded three albums, and then Camel. He also played keys for Liverpool’s own ‘Lily The Pink’ hitmakers the Scaffold – one of several secrets he divulges in this fascinating conversation with Mark Powell.

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The Martin Newell Story
Reluctant pop star Martin Newell and his canine chum Colin made the trip from Wivenhoe in Essex to Cherry Red TV studios to tell his fascinating story. He’s passed through many cult groups – most notably the Cleaners From Venus – before resigning himself to the life of a solo artist and his dog. Working in the footsteps of classic British rock songwriters Pete Townshend and Ray Davies, he carved his own unique niche in pop culture and stands today as a literate, amusing and multi-faceted singer, songwriter author and poet. This entertaining discussion is best viewed with a pint in the hand; Newell would surely be the ideal pub companion.

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The Tornados Story
The Tornados will always be remembered for 1962's anthemic instrumental 'Telstar', a song intended to evoke the dawn of the space age, complete with sound effects which made history by hitting the top of the US Hot 100. The combination of their musicianship an the production of the mad genius Joe Meek proved unstoppable for a few more singles until the coming of Merseybeat cut short their career at the top. Two of their originals, keyboard-player Roger LaVern and drummer Clem Cattini, help tell the true story of a band that, however briefly, ruled the pop world and are still fondly remembered. Not least by Muse, whose Matt Bellamy is the son of a member.

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The Roy Carr Part 1 Story
Readers of New Musical Express will recognize the name of Roy Carr as that late lamented weekly’s longest-serving journalist. Carr is also notable as being the main compiler of compilation albums for the UK music press for nearly 20 years. During the Eighties and Nineties Carr compiled the majority of tape and CD compilations given away with music magazines such as NME, Vox and Melody Maker, most notably the genre-defining ‘C86’ collection. He now uses the expertise picked up in a long and varied career that started as a musician in the Sixties with the Executives to compile albums for Cherry Red’s Giant Steps Records label; here he talks to Robin Greatorex about the many superstars he has interviewed in his writing career.

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The Joe Meek Story Part 1
Though it all happened nearly half a century ago, the true story of maverick UK record producer Joe Meek has inspired a book, Telstar Man by John Repsch, a stage play and a movie. His biographer here talks to Iain McNay about his labour of love, revealing some of the weird and wonderful facts he uncovered in hundreds of hours researching the life and work of the man behind hits by the Tornados, Heinz, John Leyton and others. The work of Meek is still considered groundbreaking: this revealing interview may give some clues why.

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The Joe Meek Story Part 2
This follows the Joe Meek story to its tragic and violent end, when the producer ended his own life with a shotgun. It picks up as ‘Telstar’ hit Number 1 on both sides of the Atlantic and charts the inevitable decline in his fortunes after producing the biggest-selling UK record ever to that time (sales in excess of five million). Unfortunately Meek’s status as a maverick outsider in the music business leasing his recordings to major labels left him exposed and, after the beat boom rendered his recordings sounding less cutting-edge, the story ended in his studio over a shop in North London in 1967.

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The Early Barclay James Harvest Story with Woolly Wolstenholme
Keyboard-player Woolly Wolstenholme was a founder member of British symphonic rockers Barclay James Harvest, after whom EMI’s mighty Harvest label was named. Back in 1968 they were considered to share the potential of Pink Floyd, their more famous labelmates, and though they didn’t make it as big they are still major concert draws on the European mainland. Woolly, whose Mellotron was an integral part of the Barclays’ sound, covers the band’s pioneering early years with pithy northern wit and self-deprecating humour.

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The Claire Hamill Story
It’s a real surprise, given her formidable talents as a singer-songwriter, that Claire Hamill is not a household name. She signed to the prestigious Island Records when still at school and recruited the likes of Free and John Martyn to play on her first album, produced by Island boss Chris Blackwell whose protégée she was. She went on to work with the Kinks’ Ray Davies, briefly front rock band Wishbone Ash and eventually move into the field of new age music. She discusses her unique and fascinating career with Mark Powell.

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The Simon Fisher Turner Story
A man of many varied talents, Simon Fisher Turner was launched as ‘Britain’s David Cassidy’, yet somehow survived the tag to become an enduring presence on the British alternative music scene. He has built a niche career on él records, part of the Cherry Red empire, and has a fascinating story to tell, starting with a choir-school childhood and graduating through a juvenile acting career to his 15 minutes of pop stardom and, more recently, making a series of movie soundtracks for Derek Jarman. From screams to the big screen, this is a story with a difference.

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AUTHOR STORIES

The Specials Story With Paul Williams
Paul Williams is a concert promoter, creator and editor of cult fanzine Street Feeling, administrator of the Specials website and valued contributor to many projects within the ska world. His lifelong interest in ska supergroup the Specials inspired him to be the first to research and document the band’s' history in You’re Wondering Now. This privately published book, updated and re-published by Cherry Red in 2009, detailed the story of the band, its members and their post-Specials careers, along with comprehensive discographies, gig listings and an amazing collection of unseen photographs from the band themselves. Here he traces the story of the band with Matt Bristow.

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The Tamla Motown Story With Terry Wilson
Tamla Motown’s UK output between 1965 and 1976  saw the likes of the Supremes, Four Tops, Temptations, Marvin Gaye and many more make an indelible mark on music with a string of unforgettable singles and underrated albums. In his Cherry Red-published book Tamla Motown – The Story Behind The UK Singles, author Terry Wilson created a complete discography telling the stories behind each and every song in fascinating detail. Here he talks all things Motown with Dave Timperley, himself no mean aficionado of the soul scene.

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The Johnny Thunders With Nina Antonia
Johnny Thunderswasthe New York Dolls guitarist and Heartbreakers lead singer. In Cold Blood, Nina Antonia‘s biography of the late legendary Thunderswas first published in 1987 by Jungle Records. Later reprinted in 2000 by Cherry Red Books and still available, it has remained a cult classic for more than 20 years and, during the writing of the book between 1982 and 1987, Nina became friends with Thunders when he spent time in London.
Merseyside-born Nina, an acknowledged expert on the punk scene who followed up her first biography with a New York Dolls biography, The New York Dolls: Too Much Too Soon, and has written a book on the Only Ones, helps flesh out the Thunders legend in conversation with Matt Bristow.

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Music To Die For With Mick Mercer
Mick Mercer is the world-renowned authority on all things Goth and post-Goth. Books like Gothic Rock and Hex Files: the Goth Bible have been acclaimed for his combination of encyclopedic knowledge and opinionated writing style. Mick came into the Cherry TV studio on the publication of Music To Die For, his latest genre-defining work, to explain how the MySpace internet phenomenon has helped fuel a worldwide explosion of related music, adding countries to the musical map but also spawning in a bewildering variety of sub-genres – and how he is the man to create order from the resulting chaos.

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Buring Britain With Ian Glasper
If anyone can claim to be the definitive biographer of post-punk music it’s west country author Ian Glasper with his trilogy Burning Britain, The Day The Country Died and Trapped In A Scene (all Cherry Red Books). He explains his passion for the hardcore scene of the Eighties, how he got involved in the music and how an obsession turned into a critically acclaimed labour of love. For Ian, the punk ethic is very much alive and well, and the message he heard in Discharge’s music still holds true today. If his enthusiastic, informed and insightful conversation touches you, buy the music – and the books!

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Telstar Man – The Joe Meek Story With John Repsch
Though it all happened nearly half a century ago, the true story of maverick UK record producer Joe Meek has inspired a book, Telstar Man by John Repsch, a stage play and a movie. His biographer here talks to Iain McNay about his labour of love, revealing some of the weird and wonderful facts he uncovered in hundreds of hours researching the life and work of the man behind hits by the Tornados, Heinz, John Leyton and others. The work of Meek is still considered groundbreaking: this revealing interview may give some clues why.

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William S Burroughs
Selected video material from William S Burroughs

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The Ian Glasper Story
If anyone can claim to be the definitive biographer of post-punk music it’s west country author Ian Glasper with his trilogy Burning Britain, The Day The Country Died and Trapped In A Scene (all Cherry Red Books). He explains his passion for the hardcore scene of the Eighties, how he personally got involved in the music and how an obsession turned into a critically acclaimed labour of love. For Ian, the punk ethic is very much alive and well, and the message he heard in Discharge’s music still holds true today. If his enthusiastic, informed and insightful conversation touches you, buy the music – and the books!

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MUSIC BUSINESS

Music Managers Forum
Since its inception in 1992, the MMF has worked hard to educate, inform and represent UK managers (and their artists) as well as offering a network through which managers can share experiences, opportunities and information. In this interview by Matt Bristow Chief Executive Jon Webster talks us through the MMF and their modus operandi.

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Julie’s Bicycle Alison Tickell
Iain McNay talks to Alison Tickell about “Julie’s Bicycle”, an organisation based upon addressing the issues on what the music industry can do for environmental concerns and the ways that companies from across the creative industries can reduce their carbon emissions.

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MPA With Stephen Navin
 Stephen Navin, the CEO of the Music Publishers Association talks to Iain McNay about the MPA, which exists to safeguard and promote the interests of music publishers and the writers signed to them; represent these interests to government, the music industry, the media and the public, provide publishers with a forum, a collective voice and a wide range of benefits, services and training courses; promote an understanding of the value of music and the importance of copyright; and provide information and guidance to members of the public.

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AIM History With Alison Wenham
The Association of Independent Music is a non-profit-making trade organisation for independent record companies and distributors in the UK, whose job is to help the individual members’ businesses and to support the needs of the independent sector. In this interview, Iain McNay talks to Alison Wenham, the Chairman and CEO of AIM.

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AIM News With Michael Fuller
Iain McNay talks to AIM’s head of Business Affairs, Michael Fuller, about how AIM works, what it does and how it helps its members.

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Legal And Business News
Russell Roberts, a senior partner at Sheridans, one of the top entertainment legal firms in the UK, talks to Iain McNay about the latest current affairs within the music industry, including the issues and implications of the potential change in copyright laws as well as the current trend of “360” record deals that are becoming de rigueur within the music industry.  

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Shindig!
Jon Mills speaks to Tim Forester about the equally influential and obcure “West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band”, a Los Angeles based psychedelic band of the 1960’s, covering the history of the band and an indepth dissection of their discography.

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